Archives for category: Paris

Kale in Saint Lunaire & Dark Rye

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Photo credit: Kevin German

Back in November, I spent four days with a production team from Austin, LA and Paris to film a mini-documentary about The Kale Project for Dark Rye Online Magazine. Dark Rye, funded by Whole Foods Market, does seasonal stories about food, health, sustainability, design and social enterprise. I was extremely honored to have The Kale Project be chosen for their spring “Revival” issue.

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Photo Credit: Kevin German

Photo credit: Kevin German

Photo credit: Kevin German

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Photo Credit: Kevin German

As a former theatre person, I’ve never been camera shy but comfort in front of the lens only goes so far when you’re asked to dance with kale in the middle of Parisian streets or take action shots with kale at Trocadero. I kept reminding myself that this was a once in a lifetime opportunity and to just enjoy it. The production team was incredible and we had a blast over the four days of filming. We hit up the Marché Batignolles, The Superfoods Café to make a few recipes, the streets of Paris and met up with Bruno Verjus at his restaurant Table to talk to him more about how he cooks with chou d’aigrette (another one of the beautiful names for kale in French!)

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For me the most exciting part of the filming was our day excursion to Saint Malo to meet up with Kale Project Ambassador, Virginie and her AMAP (for readers in America, AMAP is the equivalent of Community Support Agriculture (CSA)) farmer, Anthony who farms in Saint Lunaire. Virginie first contacted me over a year ago with interest to work with Anthony to grow kale for her region. After a lot of back and forth, Anthony planted the seeds this past summer and the kale was ready just in time for the film.

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I could not have been more excited to share this story with the team because it is how I always imagined the Project working out. I wanted to work with local, French farmers and then try to do more tastings and explanation at markets or AMAPs and that’s exactly what we did in Saint Lunaire. On a side note, this was also my first trip to Saint Malo and I can’t wait to return. Even with the cold, rainy, grey weather, the views and air were fantastic.

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For those that live in the Saint Malo area and are interested in this AMAP, it was created in February 2009 and is 100% bio. Anthony is the sole farmer and provides almost 90 baskets of vegetables and fruit each week to members who come from Saint-Lunaire, Dinard, Saint-Briac and more towns in the surrounding area. Anthony’s farm, called “Saveurs des Champs”, spans about four hectares. He has one employee but also relies on help from the members of the AMAP who come pick potatoes, peas, plant zucchini or more. In fact his chou fields were behind Virginie’s house (talk about easy access to kale!) Each member of the AMAP also helps at distribution evenings, which take place under the covered market place of Saint-Lunaire across from the old 11th century church. And, in addition, Anthony has orchards and produces organic delicious apple juice. He hoped to have bees, but this has proven very difficult but he wants to keep trying.

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Anthony does not stop with fruits and vegetables. He also has two traditional Brittany farming horses (Cheval de Trait Breton) which he is training to use in the fields, as well a vanishing breed of Brittany sheep (Moutons des Landes de Bretagne) which he is helping to bring back and sells for wool and meat. He sells his sheeps’ wool to a Brittany company that uses only wool from Brittany sheep. They make the clothes by hand and sell them in markets around the area. He also has a few Brittany goats (Chèvre des Fossés) to clear the brush from his fields.

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To help with the sheep, Anthony uses a large guard dog from the Pyrenees (who lives with the sheep) and then a small sheep-herding dog also from the Pyrenees named Ilka. Ilka turned out to the star of the day, jumping around and devouring kale for the camera.

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photo (21)

Everyone at the AMAP distribution was so friendly and excited to be a part of the film. And those coming to pick up their baskets were genuinely interested in learning about the lost cabbage and most of the responses to the kale chips were very positive. Honestly, my evening with everyone was by far one of my most memorable so far in France. I am so thankful to have worked with Virginie and Anthony and hope for more kale crops in the future.

To see the video click here.

From the wonderful Hip Paris blog…

The Other Side of Montmartre: Coffee, Food and Shopping Off the Beaten Path

HiP Paris Blog, Café Lomi, Montmartre Round Up

Café Lomi

Paris’ 18th arrondissement, to the north of the city, is a vast and varied area, encompassing some of the most affluent enclaves (right up at the top of the hill) and some of the shadiest (La Goutte d’Or), as well as one of the city’s most frequented tourist spots — Le Sacre Coeur and the surrounding streets and squares in Montmartre.

HiP Paris Blog, www.larallonge.fr, La Rallonge, Montmartre Round Up

La Rallonge

But slightly off the beaten track is the more unassuming part of this neighborhood: the residential area in the foothills of Montmartre, extending from the arrondissement’s town hall – where I happen to have lived for the best part of a decade – which is well worth the detour to discover the lesser known shops, restaurants and more that the guide-book clutching hoards are yet to discover.

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HiP Paris Blog, Manufacture Parisienne, Kim Laidlaw, Montmartre Round UpManufacture Parisienne (Kim Laidlaw)

Here is a selection of my favorite new and newish places that look set to make this part of the 18th a destination on any discerning visitor or local’s itinerary. Food in the area ranges from a quick bite and coffee right up to fine French dining.

HiP Paris Blog, Café Lomi, photo by Keith Isaacs of Forms+Colors, Montmartre Round Up

Café Lomi (Keith Isaacs)

The recent arrival of Café Lomi (3 ter Rue Marcadet, 75018 Paris), a serious coffee joint that roasts its own beans and hosts tasting sessions, brought much joy to local laptop-wielding freelancers who now regularly set up shop at one of the wooden tables in the cosy yet spacious café to enjoy superlative coffee, delicious scones and a selection of light lunch and brunch options (such as quiche and salad) whilst taking advantage of the free Wi-Fi access and laidback welcome.

HiP Paris Blog, Café Lomi, Montmartre Round Up

HiP Paris Blog, Bululu, Montmartre Round Up

Café Lomi (above)/ Bululu

Another relaxed – and cheap – place to grab a bite in the area is Bululu (20 Rue de la Fontaine du But, 75018), serving freshly made arepas, a Venezuelan sandwich made from gluten-free flatbread and filled with yummy delights such as avocado, beans and cheese, served with ice cold beer and banana chips.

HiP Paris Blog, Table d Eugene, Kim Laidlaw, Montmartre Round Up

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Table d Eugene (Kim Laidlaw)

On the other end of the scale is Table d’Eugène (18 Rue Eugène Sue, 75018), the freshly revamped gastronomic restaurant where you can eat a three-course fixed-price menu of French haute cuisine for the incredibly reasonable price of just €52.

HiP Paris Blog, Manufacture Parisienne, Kim Laidlaw, Montmartre Round Up

Manufacture Parisienne (Kim Laidlaw)

Chef Geoffroy Maillard, formerly of Le Bristol, creates inspired seasonal dishes such as lobster with vanilla, chestnuts and mushrooms, matched with carefully sourced, independently-produced wines, all savored in this intimate restaurant tastefully decorated in soothing tones of chocolate and white.

HiP Paris Blog, La Rallonge, Montmartre Round Up

La Rallonge

From the same team comes the recently opened wine and tapas bar La Rallonge (16 Rue Eugène Sue, 75018), just a few doors up from Table d’Eugène, serving the same excellent wines as well as a selection of small plates to share, all anchored around the high quality of individual ingredients, including Serrano ham croquettes with onions and béchamel, or truffle risotto, as well as cheese and charcuterie platters showcasing delicacies such as bellota, coppa and manchego.

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HiP Paris Blog, La Rallonge, Montmartre Round Up

La Rallonge

This part of town is also a real gold mine for independent boutiques, including the charming Manufacture Parisienne (93 rue Marcadet, 75018) that seems to have jumped out of the pages of a fairy tale.

HiP Paris Blog, Manufacture Parisienne, Kim Laidlaw, Montmartre Round Up

Manufacture Parisienne (Kim Laidlaw)

The almost entirely white space sells an array of artisan-made wares and gifts for children, adults and the home, sourced from family-run businesses and companies clinging to their savoir-faire, and often produced in limited editions especially for the shop. Every six weeks there is a new theme (Christmas, Valentine’s Day, Halloween…) and the stock and the décor change, and a new little box of goodies (including, for example, stationary, a book, sweets) in keeping with the theme goes on sale.

HiP Paris Blog, Manufacture Parisienne, Kim Laidlaw, Montmartre Round Up

HiP Paris Blog, Manufacture Parisienne, Kim Laidlaw, Montmartre Round Up

Manufacture Parisienne (Kim Laidlaw)

Another new boutique is Maison Nordik (159 Rue Marcadet, 75018), set up by a young French-Danish couple, selling vintage mid-century modern Scandinavian furniture in excellent condition sourced directly from Denmark in a spacious 100m2 two-level shop. Just up the hill, eccentric French brand Atypyk (17 rue Lambert, 75018) sells quirky and humorous knick knacks ranging from a cheese-shaped dish sponge to an “R.Mutt” sticker to turn your loo into a Duchamp-inspired work of art.

HiP Paris Blog, Maison Nordik, Manufacture Parisienne, Kim Laidlaw, Montmartre Round Up

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Maison Nordik & Manufacture Parisienne (above) / Maison Nordik (Kim Laidlaw)

Les Mauvaises Graines (25 Rue Custine, 75018) is an incredibly stylish plant shop – or indeed “urban gardening concept store”, as it calls itself – selling framed butterflies, vases and candles alongside ready made potted gardens to take away, and beautiful plants grown in the Paris region without the use of pesticides or chemical fertilizers.

HiP Paris Blog, Les Mauvaises Graines, Montmartre Round Up

HiP Paris Blog, Les Mauvaises Graines, Montmartre Round Up

Les Mauvaises Graines

 

Another recent addition to this side of Montmartre is the completely renovated 1920s building that is the Louxor cinema (170 Boulevard de Magenta, 75010), complete with its impressive mosaicked neo-Egyptian architecture, which reopened in April 2013 after 20 years of closure. The vast movie theatre houses three screens, one of which has a ceiling painted with a night-sky mural in the style of an Egyptian tomb, and specializes in art house films.

HiP Paris Blog, La Rallonge, Montmartre Round Up

La Rallonge

These new and/or revamped delights, together with an authentic, neighborhood charm and so many other wonderful fixtures that I don’t have the space to mention, make this part of the 18th arrondissement a worthwhile, up-and-coming (and yet to be overrun) destination in Paris for shoppers, foodies, coffee addicts and culture lovers alike. I look forward to bumping in to you there, sometime.

HiP Paris Blog, Maison Nordik, Kim Laidlaw, Montmartre Round Up

Maison Nordik (Kim Laidlaw)

Related links:

  • Ylenia takes us on a stroll around Montmartre, which just happens to be one of her favorite neighborhoods
  • Want to see more of the cozy Café Lomi? Paris Select has also payed a visit to the coffee gem
  • Don’t miss Thomas article for the HiP Paris blog about Centre Commercial, another great shopping spot in Paris

From the inimitable Hip Paris blog…

Bio Chic: Our Favorite Organic Beauty Boutiques in Paris

Posted: 19 Dec 2013 07:19 AM PST

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Senteurs de Fée, Bio Beauty

Senteurs de Fée

It’s no secret that French girls love their products. Here in Paris, you can find a cream, serum or supplement for just about anything that ails – from cellulite to les cernes to an old fashioned case of the blues.

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Mademoiselle Bio, Bio Beauty

Mademoiselle Bio

Traditionally, most of these (often fabulous) remedies have been found at the parfumerie or pharmacie. (Remember Tory’s post on French pharmacy favorites?) But a fresh breed of organic, natural and holistic goodies is making its mark on the Parisian beauty scene and finding a niche at the intersection of bio and la beauté.

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Senteurs de Fée, Bio Beauty

Senteurs de Fée

As for me, I’ve long been a skeptic when it comes to natural beauty goods, wary of pasty products and cardboard packaging filled with good intentions but questionable effectiveness. But the more I read about carcinogenic cosmetics bearing unpronounceable ingredients, I’ve started to wonder: Could these Parisian bio boutiques change the mind (and even the skin) of a conventional beauty brand devotee? I decided to investigate.

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Florame

Here’s a roundup of favorites that sell gorgeous, natural remedies, scents and treatments perfect for any aspiring Parisian bobo beauty.

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Florame

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Mademoiselle Bio, Bio Beauty

Mademoiselle Bio

Mademoiselle Bio
The largest retailer I visited, Mademoiselle Bio is a small French chain – the organic answer to beauty emporiums like Sephora and Marionnaud (minus the olfactory assault.) In a clean, crisp setting that feels more pharmacy than perfumerie, the shop carries beloved, mostly European brands like Melita, Weleda, Phyt’s and of course, Dr. Hausckhka. There are also a number of niche lines as well as cult organic perfumers Les Fleurs de Bach and Honoré des Pres.

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Mademoiselle Bio

Unable to resist the promise of a sparkling complexion (hope springs eternal!), the knowledgeable saleswoman convinced me to try an apple-based cleanser à l’huile. Oil cleanser for my skin? Surely she was joking. But after a few days of use, my interest is piqued. I wouldn’t say radiant but perhaps I’m showing a bit of improved clarity and evened tone? There might be something to this bio-beauty thing after all…

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Mademoiselle Bio, Bio Beauty

Mademoiselle Bio

(8 boutiques in Paris)
28 Rue des Archives, Paris 75003
Tel: 01 42 78 30 86
Metro: Hotel de Ville

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Mademoiselle Bio, Bio Beauty

Mademoiselle Bio

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Florame, Bio Beauty

Florame

Florame
I visited the Florame boutique on the rue Dupuytren in the 6th determined not to buy but simply to savor the experience of the high-quality essential oils for which the brand is known.

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Florame, Bio Beauty

Florame

Deeply devoted to sustainability and fair trade, Florame prides itself on its dedication to the farmers (in France, Madagascar and beyond) who produce the plants from which they draw their oils and to the integrity of their brand that bears the Cosmebio, AB and Ecocert imprimaturs. Highlights include their 100% pure essential oil home scent diffusers, aromatherapy oils and organic skincare for men, including cedar and argan oils. A Christmas gift for the eco-conscious hubby? I’ll be back…

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Florame, Bio Beauty

Florame

8 Rue Dupuytren, Paris 75006
Tel: 01 44 07 34 53
Metro: Odeon

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Florame, Bio Beauty

Senteurs de Fée

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Senteurs de Fée, Bio Beauty

Senteurs de Fée

Senteurs de Fée
This gem of a boutique on the rue Sevigne in the Marais bears witness to the passion and knowledge of its Parisian owner, Katia Bielli, a self-proclaimed artist and florist. Visiting her gorgeous boutique is to enter her world devoted to natural, organic goodness as embodied in beautiful massage oils, skin and hair care products and a seductive world of scent.

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Senteurs de Fée, Bio Beauty

Senteurs de Fée

It was impossible to resist the lovely packaging and pure promise of her l’Huile Vraie body oil (light, non-greasy, gorgeous) combining rose, neroli, jasmine, ylang ylang…you get the idea. Softer skin that leaves a trace of delicate scent, this one had me convinced. I was also tempted by her “regenerating” cleanser, Nectar de Rose. (I made a mental note to return when I exhaust my tube of apple/oil cleanser).

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Senteurs de Fée, Bio Beauty

Senteurs de Fée

For those seeking a complete bio experience, Mademoiselle Bio also offers a range of on-site treatments like massages, facials (you choose from their product line), manicures and organic waxing. In the end, when it comes to natural skin and body care, my investigation has made me a convert. After all, shouldn’t we care as much about what we put on our bodies as what we put in them?

HiP Paris Blog, Didier Gauducheau, Mademoiselle Bio, Bio Beauty

Mademoiselle Bio

10 Rue de Sévigné, 75004 Paris
Tel: 01 44 54 97 27
Metro: St Paul

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Florame

Related links:

Written by Paige Bradley Frost for the HiP Paris Blog. All photos by Didier Gauducheau. Looking for a fabulous vacation rental in Paris, London, Provence, or Tuscany? Check out Haven in Paris.

 

eclairsparis

I found these lovely articles about eclairs in Paris from the blogs “Lost in Cheeseland”  and “the hip Paris blog”, which I will share momentarily, but what got to me was the fact that even the Parisians, who are known for doing things a particular way, have taken off down the American path of derivatives…you can’t just have a donut, it has to be a cronut, or a Monut, or some fancy jacked up flavor, like chocolate chai.  Now the Parisians are doing the same thing with eclairs, and I’m really not sure I’m ready for such a seismic shift in culture, nor a yuzu flavored sweet…

We Americans have been practicing the craft of derivatives for a very long time (Baskin Robbins 31 flavors anyone?) but the French…mais non!! How do you feel about this overabundance of choice?

The New Wave of Eclairs in Paris

 

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French pastry remains a fierce object of fascination but these days, more for the ways in which it breaks with convention than its storied past.  The most iconic in this vast spectrum is unequivocally the éclair, firmly anchored in the national consciousness and a consummate favorite among children and adults alike.

Despite its status as the most preferred pastry among French gourmands, the éclair has rarely inspired the imaginations of pastry chefs who have long perceived its simple form too limiting. But that’s beginning to change with the arrival of two shops entirely devoted to the cream-puff pastry, prepared to usher it into the canons of contemporary French pâtisserie.

L’Eclair de Génie plays up the éclair as an epoch-defining work of art in a concept-store environment (and has since its founder Christophe Adam was revolutionizing the pastry for Fauchon) while L’Atelier de l’Eclair introduces a savory form of the classic treat in addition to their many sweet iterations.

wrote about both for En Route Magazine (Air Canada) but what I didn’t mention was my personal favorite. By dint of crafting each éclair by hand, irregularities in the shells are noticeable at L’Atelier de l’Eclair and they’re fiercely proud of their artisanal approach, which I love. But Christophe Adam’s prowess in aesthetic, flavor and form trumps all of pastry chef Loïc Bret‘s creations. Flavors change with the seasons, like a fashion collection, but a two regulars get my vote: Madagascar Vanilla topped with toasted pecans and Yuzu Lemon.

Read more about the two and decide for yourself on your next visit to Paris! Click HERE to read my article on En Route.

And from the Hip Paris blog, read about a smackdown between the two revered eclair shops mentioned above…

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What do you think on the topic? Like it, hate it, can’t decide?

 Eating, Drinking & Shopping in Paris’ HiP South-of-Pigalle Area

 

HiP Paris SOPI Sebastien Gaudard4 Didier Gauducheau

For decades, Pigalle was known mainly for its sex shops, seedy shows and working girls. During WWII, this sketchy section of Paris earned the nickname “Pig Alley” thanks to its bawdy rep. But these days, Pigalle has earned a few new monikers as well as a cleaner reputation. Now, in NYC fashion, trendy locals refer to it as either NoPi (North of Pigalle) or SoPi (South of Pigalle).

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While both North and South have plenty to offer, it’s SoPi that’s become the latest neighborhood to watch.  Moving beyond nighttime entertainment, SoPi is packed with plenty of destination restaurants, food shops, cafes and enough to make an itinerary that runs from morning until nighttime.

HiP Paris SOPI Rocketship3 Didier Gauducheau

To get a day’s worth of enjoyment out of one the city’s hippest ‘hood, kick start things with some caffeine at Rocketship. Like many places in Paris, they don’t open until later in the morning, so make your way there leisurely. In keeping with the neighborhood’s NY-inspired nickname, this concept coffeeshop works a Brooklyn vibe and offers chai lattes alongside coffee from Coutume.

HiP Paris SOPI Rocketship1 Didier Gauducheau

After coffee, take time to browse the boutique. Benoit, the owner, prides himself on finding unique treasures and includes a good number of pieces from SoPi-based artisans.

Le Rocketship, 13 bis rue Henri Monnier, Paris, 75009, +33 1 48 78 23 66

 

Afterwards make a detour just a few doors down to check out Natier. The lovely lady behind this chocolate shop, Madame Letterrier, stocks up on everything you need from small treats to pretty Parisian gifts to take home.  Here you’ll find classic truffles from artisan chocolatiers, jewel toned pate de fruit and a sweet selection of teas from Palais de Thes.

Natier, 1 rue Henri Monnier, Paris, 75009, +33 1 42 81 35 75

HiP Paris SOPI Depanneur2 Didier Gauducheau

If you’ve spent the appropriate amount of shopping time, you should now be ready for lunch at le Depanneur. Paris nightlife entrepreneur Oliver Demarle has pulled in the Cantine California crew of Paris food truck fame to give what was a dying dive bar an overhaul with a sunnier outlook and totally revamped menu.

HIP Paris SOPI Depanneur1 Didier Gauducheau

Join local trendwatchers on the sidewalk terrace for big, sloppy burgers topped with Frenchified condiments like bleu cheese or Beaufort.

Le Depanneur, 27 rue Pierre Fontaine, Paris, 75009, +33 1 48 74 48 74

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But don’t forget to save room for a little dessert at your next stop! Walk off your late lunch on the way to award-winning pasty chef Sebastien Gaudard’s SoPi location.  Don’t be fooled by the retro and minimalist décor – here, it’s the flavors that really pop.

HIP Paris SOPI Sebastien Gaudard1 Didier GauducheauHiP Paris SOPI Sebastien Gaudard3 Didier Gauducheau

Grab a handful of macarons or a sorbet to go and walk north back up rue des Martyrs, lingering for window shopping (or more) at its many bakeries, cafes, and wine, sweet, oil and food shops.

Patisserie des Martyrs by Sebastien Gaudard22 rue des Martyrs, Paris, 75009, +33 1 71 18 24 70

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Hopefully you’re ready for cocktail hour now because you’re close to the city’s latest and greatest tiki joint, Dirty Dick.  This bar embodies the spirit of the new Pigalle.  In a naughty wink to the past, they’ve kept the name of the former girlie club in which they reside, but completely upgraded the offerings into something new, relevant and lighthearted.

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A bamboo bar, umbrella topped drinks, and tiki totems give the place a fun and frivolous feel. At the same time, the relaxed staff knows their stuff and delivers delicious drinks with a smile.  It’s the perfect Pigalle spot to sink into for a pre-dinner drink or two.

Dirty Dick, 10 rue Frochot, Paris, 75009

If you’re ready to experience more of the neighborhood for dinner, there are plenty of options such as PantruchePremicesMaison Mere and more.  But, possibly the best option now is to wander the winding streets and discover something on your own.  While a set itinerary is great, there’s nothing more rewarding than finding your own hidden gem. And, fortunately, SoPi is now full of them.

Written by Forest Collins for the HiP Paris Blog. All images by Didier Gauducheau, except where otherwise noted. Looking for a fabulous vacation rental in Paris, London, Provence, or Tuscany? Check out Haven in Paris.

 

The world’s first ever WikiBar opens in Paris

Wednesday, 26 June 2013

Another gem from WGSN…

French designer Mathieu Lehanneur has designed the interior of the first ever WikiBar, in Paris. On the menu is a range of innovative food and drink under the name of WikiCells, for the French natives, or WikiPearls for the English speakers.

Created by Harvard professor David Edwards and French designer François Azambourgin 2012, these Wiki Foods mimic the natural principle of grapes: a sphere of food protected by an edible coating. The idea behind the project is to offer ecologically responsible nourishment that will reduce the pollution directly linked to packaging.

The concept has been adapted to drinks and ice cream, all available at the WikiBar. Lehanneur’s decor makes a geometrical reference to the molecular structure of the foods.
A mobile and pop-up WikiBar are already on the horizon, while the next permanent one is already being designed in the forthcoming Lab Cambridge, the American version of Le Laboratoire initiated by David Edwards.
The WikiBar is situated at Le Laboratoire, 4 rue du Bouloi, 75001 Paris.

Homebuildlife subscribers can read about more innovations in food packaging here, and about another innovative Le Laboratoire concept, The Olfactive Project, here.